A REMINDER ONCE AND A WHILE

For many people of my generation, Remembrance Day is not lost on us. We are the sons and daughters of men and women who either fought, served or lost their lives in war, but also many of our parents had lived under occupation in Europe. Both my mother and father were teenagers in the Netherlands during that time.

My biggest worry when I was a teenager was whether or not I could get Rolling Stones tickets. For them, it was staying alive. So I learned very early on how important this day was and how significant Canada was in the liberation of The Netherlands. But even I could get a little distracted or distant as the years went on, concentrating less on what the day meant and looking at it more as a day off. Now, the big concern is whether the meaning is losing significance with each generation after, even though we’ve lost soldiers in recent conflicts like Afghanistan.   Sure, it will be taught and studied in history classes, but how does one really continue to understand as more time passes and those who saw it first hand continue to pass as well?

Not everyone can experience this, but I had a reminder about 4 years ago. We were fortunate enough to do another trip to France with Scenic tours on CTV Morning Live. This time, we toured the north of France and our last stop was Juno Beach and the memorial centre there. But it was a trip to the Canadian Military Cemetery at Beny Sur Mer that it really hits you.

Walking among the headstones, each of them with the name, hometown and birthdate of each soldier.  The youngest I read was 18, the oldest was 35.  Row after row, after row. Each of them was someone’s son, brother, uncle, father, grandfather. Men and women at the start or prime of their lives. No one can look at that and not be overwhelmed by what is the true and tragic cost of war. It is also why we should, in another sense, fight like hell that this could never, ever, happen again.

Like I said, not everyone can experience this, but it was a reminder of how lucky I am and we all are. Let’s hope we can continue to remember this not only on November 11th but every day. Every generation..from now on.

THANK YOU WALLY

As I’m writing this, the BC Lions are getting their helmets kicked in the Eastern Division Semi-Final…not the way you want to end a season. Certainly not the way you want a career to end to, especially when you’re the most iconic coach in the CFL.

Wally Buono deserved a better final game.

When he came to the BC Lions in 2003, they were still a pretty competitive team but got blown out in the Semi Final ( sounds familiar ). Changes needed to be made, but things were made a little easier courtesy of the Calgary Stampeders, who became the dominant team in the West under Buono up until that time.

However, it seems ownership felt it knew more about running a team than Wally, including the owner insisting his son gets to play quarterback. Even with 2 years left on his contract,  Wally left Calgary.   It was too good to be true for Lions owner David Braley and team president Bob Ackles. Both were pretty smart guys anyway, but this was a no-brainer. Wally Buono became head coach and GM of the BC Lions in 2003.

It resulted in four straight first place finishes, five straight playoff appearances, four trips to the Grey Cup, winning three of them.

He brought back an expectation of winning, He made a city, a province and the fans proud of their team. His last few seasons have not been the best and you can criticize some of the decisions he’s made. After giving up coaching in 2011 to concentrate on being a GM, it was hard for him to watch his team under perform, so he’s was back on the sidelines in 2016. Some may think of him as a control freak who was past his prime, but there’s no denying what he brought to this team. At that point in time, there was no other choice.

I was also fortunate enough to meet him on several occasions, watch him from the sidelines. Also had a great conversation with him one afternoon at Seahawks game in Seattle. It’s easy to say he was always great to be with on those occasions because I was never a player, let alone play for him! But like him or not, he deserves a tremendous amount of respect from anyone who loves football…and he certainly deserved a better final game than he got.

So, it’s all you can say now…. Thank you Wally.